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FAQ

What is Bulk Fermentation Time?

Once the dough has been kneaded or mixed it is left to ferment in its bulk form, before it has been scaled off (cut up) into the separate loaves. The time it should be left is dictated by the Bulk Fermentation Time in the recipe. The dough can be placed in a plastic container greased with olive oil and a lid placed on the container. For rye bread you can just cover the bowl with plastic wrap.  The ideal temperature is 20°C.

What is Intermediate Proof Time?

The dough is scaled off (cut up into individual loaves) and rounded up and left to ferment covered with a tea towel. The time it should be left is dictated by the Intermediate Proof Time in the recipe. The ideal temperature is 20°C.

What is Final Proof Time?

This is the last time that the dough is left to ferment. Often it is the time after the dough has been removed from the fridge. The time it should be left is dictated by the Final Proof Time in the recipe. The ideal temperature is 20°C.

What is Retardation Time?

This is the time that the dough is stored in the fridge. Often you can just leave it overnight rather than follow the retardation time strictly. If you do want to follow the times strictly there is an option in the edit mode, scroll down to “Reminder alarms” and check the checkbox “Strict timings for alarm generation.”

What is Dough to Oven Time?

This is the total time from the moment you have finished kneading or mixing the dough until it is ready to go into the oven.

How do I know if my dough is fully developed after kneading?

When we knead we do it in lots of 10 minutes and then 5 minutes rest. The rest time is important as this is when the protein strands start to bond. Normally it takes 3 rounds of kneading and then resting before the dough is fully developed. The real test is to gently stretch the dough to try and form a translucent window in the dough. If you can do this successfully then you know the dough is ready.

Image of the dough stretch test.

Dough stretch test.